Hours

Mon 10:00 AM – 8:00 PM
Tue  10:00 AM – 8:00 PM
Wed 10:00 AM – 8:00 PM
Thu  10:00 AM – 8:00 PM
Fri    10:00 AM – 8:00 PM
Sat   10:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Sun  11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

COVID-19 Vaccine Appointment Scheduler

PHARMACY STAFF WILL NOT BE ABLE TO ANSWER ANY COVID-19 VACCINE RELATED QUESTIONS OVER THE PHONE. PLEASE USE OUR ONLINE CHAT ON THE BOTTOM RIGHT OR EMAIL BAKERSDRUGS@GMAIL.COM. ANY CALLS WILL DIRECT YOU BACK TO OUR WEBSITE.

 

BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

Read before accessing our appointment scheduler:

  • Appointment requests will be pending approval based on sufficient supply. Appointments needs to be ACCEPTED to be considered confirmed. Separate notification will be sent out once your appointment is ACCEPTED.
  • Pharmacy staff will not be able to answer any COVID-19 vaccine related questions over the phone. Please use our online chat or contact form below.

On the day of your confirmed appointment:

  • Arrive 15 minutes before your appointment.
  • Bring in your valid ID and insurance card if you have one (i.e. Medicare, Medicaid, Private Insurance Card)
  • There is no charge for the COVID-19 vaccine regardless if you are insured or uninsured.
  • Patients will be asked to fill out a consent form: COVID-19 Vaccine Consent Form (Note: Can be completed and brought in at the time of appointment).
  • Patients will be asked to fill out online New York State COVID-19 Vaccine Form: https://forms.ny.gov/s3/vaccine (Note: Completion page needs to be shown at the time of your appointment).
  • Patients who qualify under preexisting conditions will be asked to fill out a cerification form: Certification of Medical Condition for COVID Vaccination
For updates and more follow us on our social media pages below.

COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions

Availability FAQ

The latest information about COVID-19 vaccine will be located on this page. Please read through the FAQs for the most common questions. Any other questions can be answered by using our online chat which is located on the bottom right of this page or by using the contact form at the bottom of this page.

*** NOTE: Currently COVID-19 Vaccine related questions cannot be answered via telephone. Please use our online chat or contact form below.

The most up to date availability can be found through our appointment system above. If there are not any dates available, continue to check back frequently as we will add more slots as deliveries come in. Pharmacy staff members are unable to respond via telephone for any COVID-19 vaccine stock inquires.

We are currently receiving Moderna vaccines weekly and update our appointment system accordingly.

*** NOTE: Currently COVID-19 Vaccine related questions cannot be answered via telephone. Please use our online chat or contact form below.

As soon as it’s available to you. The State Department of Health will continue to share information on where and when New Yorkers can get vaccinated as more vaccine doses become available.

Under NYS Guidelines, pharmacies are able to immunize:

  • New York residents age 16 and older (Note: Moderna vaccine is approved for 18 and older)
  • Patients with eligible preexisting health conditions listed below. Please bring in this form: Certification of Medical Condition for COVID Vaccination
    • Cancer (current or in remission, including 9/11-related cancers)
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • Pulmonary disease, including but not limited to, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), asthma (moderate-to-severe), pulmonary fibrosis, cystic fibrosis and 9/11-related pulmonary diseases
    • Intellectual and developmental disabilities including Down syndrome
    • Heart conditions, including but not limited to heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies or hypertension (high blood pressure)
    • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) including but not limited to solid organ transplant or from blood or bone marrow transplant, immune deficiencies, HIV, use of corticosteroids, use of other immune weakening medicines or other causes
    • Severe obesity (body mass index of 40 kg/m2 or higher) or obesity (body mass index between 30 kg/m2 and 40 kg/m2)
    • Pregnancy
    • Sickle cell disease or thalassemia
    • Type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus
    • Cerebrovascular disease (affects blood vessels and blood supply to the brain)
    • Neurologic conditions including but not limited to Alzheimer’s disease or dementia
    • Liver disease
  • P-12 Schools (including pre-primary, primary, and secondary schools, as well as Head Start and Early Head Start)
      • P-12 school (public or non-public) or school district faculty or staff (includes all teachers, substitute teachers, student teachers, school administrators, paraprofessional staff, and support staff including bus drivers) 
      • Contractor working in a P-12 school (public or non-public) or school district (including contracted bus drivers) 
      • NYS Licensed, registered, approved or legally exempt before and after school group childcare settings including center-based and family care providers 
  • Employees or Support Staff of NYS Licensed, Registered, Approved or Legally Exempt Group Childcare Settings, including center-based and family care providers 

Currently we receive weekly shipments of Moderna vaccine.

Johnson & Johnson allocations have yet to be determined, however we will update our online booking system once we begin to carry J&J vaccine.

We do not anticipate offering Pfizer vaccine at this time.

Moderna and Pfizer that have been approved for emergency use in the U.S. by the FDA and require two shots to be effective. Second dose appointments will be made at the time of your first dose appointment.

Johnson & Johnson vaccine have been approved for emergency use in the U.S. by the FDA and require one shot to be effective.

Yes. The COVID-19 vaccines will be available at no cost to the population.

New York State is not mandating the COVID-19 vaccine.

Development FAQ

There are many factors that combined to allow the COVID-19 vaccine to be developed quickly and safely:

  • Researchers got a head start on developing a vaccine because the virus that causes COVID-19 is similar to other existing viruses.
  • Research about the new virus was shared almost immediately with scientists all over the world, which allowed work to begin on a vaccine right away.
  • Some researchers were able to run phase one and two trials at the same time.
  • The studies on COVID-19 included a larger number of people than other recent vaccine trials, meaning there were a larger number of people in the trials over a shorter period of time.
  • The federal government allowed manufacturing of the most promising vaccines to begin while the studies were ongoing. That means that when it is authorized it can be offered to the public almost immediately.

It’s important to note that all vaccine developers are required to go through each stage of the development process and meet all safety and efficacy (how well something works) standards. Learn about the many steps in the typical vaccine testing and approval process.

The ingredients in Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine are listed on page 2 here.

The ingredients in Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine are listed on page 2 here.

Clinical trials for both vaccines that have been authorized for emergency use by the FDA included thousands of men and women representing a wide range of ages from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and with varying degrees of health concerns.

Demographic breakdowns of clinical trial participants can be found here:

Eligibility and Scheduling FAQ

New Yorkers can check their eligibility through the Am I Eligible app. Eligible essential workers should contact their union or local health department for information.

Due to limited supply of the COVID vaccine from the federal government, it could take up to 14 weeks for eligible New Yorkers to schedule their vaccine shot.

You must have an appointment to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Walk-ins are not permitted. Please access our booking system at bakersdrugs.com/covid19 for appointment availabilities.

Under NYS Guidelines, pharmacies are able to immunize:

  • New York residents age 30 and older
  • Patients with eligible preexisting health conditions listed below. Please bring in this form: Certification of Medical Condition for COVID Vaccination
    • Cancer (current or in remission, including 9/11-related cancers)
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • Pulmonary disease, including but not limited to, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), asthma (moderate-to-severe), pulmonary fibrosis, cystic fibrosis and 9/11-related pulmonary diseases
    • Intellectual and developmental disabilities including Down syndrome
    • Heart conditions, including but not limited to heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies or hypertension (high blood pressure)
    • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) including but not limited to solid organ transplant or from blood or bone marrow transplant, immune deficiencies, HIV, use of corticosteroids, use of other immune weakening medicines or other causes
    • Severe obesity (body mass index of 40 kg/m2 or higher) or obesity (body mass index between 30 kg/m2 and 40 kg/m2)
    • Pregnancy
    • Sickle cell disease or thalassemia
    • Type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus
    • Cerebrovascular disease (affects blood vessels and blood supply to the brain)
    • Neurologic conditions including but not limited to Alzheimer’s disease or dementia
    • Liver disease
  • P-12 Schools (including pre-primary, primary, and secondary schools, as well as Head Start and Early Head Start)
      • P-12 school (public or non-public) or school district faculty or staff (includes all teachers, substitute teachers, student teachers, school administrators, paraprofessional staff, and support staff including bus drivers) 
      • Contractor working in a P-12 school (public or non-public) or school district (including contracted bus drivers) 
      • NYS Licensed, registered, approved or legally exempt before and after school group childcare settings including center-based and family care providers 
  • Employees or Support Staff of NYS Licensed, Registered, Approved or Legally Exempt Group Childcare Settings, including center-based and family care providers 

Pharmacies are receiving vaccines and are prioritizing individuals that are 65+. Please contact your pharmacy of choice to schedule your vaccine appointment. Additionally, there is a network of State-run sites distributing vaccine statewide – to determine eligibility and schedule appointments at New York State-run vaccination sites only, use the Am I Eligible app. You can also call the New York State COVID-19 Vaccination Hotline from 7am – 10pm, 7 days a week at 1-833-NYS-4-VAX (1-833-697-4829).

Please visit this page to see the current list of who is eligible for COVID-19 vaccination.

Safety and Effectiveness FAQ

After a COVID-19 vaccine is authorized by the FDA, many vaccine safety monitoring systems watch for adverse events (possible side effects). This ongoing monitoring can pick up on adverse events that may not have been seen in clinical trials. If an unexpected adverse event is seen, experts quickly study it further to see if it is a true safety concern. Experts then decide whether changes are needed in US vaccine recommendations.

In New York State, an added level of review was established to ensure COVID vaccine safety. Following Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA, experts on New York State’s independent COVID-19 Vaccine Clinical Advisory Task Force thoroughly review vaccine research before recommending any vaccine to New Yorkers. As of December 18, 2020, two COVID-19 vaccines have currently have currently been authorized for emergency use by the FDA and approved by New York State’s independent Clinical Advisory Task Force: the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and the Moderna vaccine.

No. None of the vaccines being studied are made up of materials that can cause disease. For example, the first vaccine approved by the FDA uses a small, harmless part of the virus’s genetic material called ‘mRNA’. This is not the virus. mRNA vaccines teach your body to create virus proteins. Your immune system develops antibodies against these proteins that will help you fight the virus that causes COVID-19 if you are exposed to it. That is called an immune response.

Studies will need to be conducted testing COVID-19 vaccines in children. To date, no Phase 3 clinical studies of COVID-19 vaccines include children younger than 12 years. Please reach out to your health care provider with specific questions. Additional information can be found on www.cdc.gov or refer to these CDC guidelines for more information.

There is limited research about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in pregnancy, but pregnant people may choose to get the COVID-19 vaccine if they are in a priority group for vaccination and do not have a medical reason not to be vaccinated. More studies are planned and vaccine manufacturers are monitoring people in the clinical trials who became pregnant. Based on current knowledge, experts believe that COVID-19 vaccines are not likely to pose a risk for people who are pregnant or trying to get pregnant.  If you are pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant, you should talk to your health care provider about your risk of getting COVID-19 and your risk of severe illness if you get sick.  Pregnant people with COVID-19 have an increased risk of severe illness. A vaccine may protect you from severe illness, which could help both you and your fetus.

No. The CDC does not recommend COVID-19 screening tests before getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

Yes. COVID-19 vaccination is especially important for people with underlying health problems like heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, and obesity. People with these conditions are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19. Please consult with your health care provider if you have specific questions about the COVID vaccine and your health.

Yes. CDC recommends that you get vaccinated even if you have already had COVID-19, because you can catch it more than once. While you may have some short-term antibody protection after recovering from COVID-19, we don’t know how long this protection will last.

You may not notice any changes in how you feel after getting the shot. But it’s also possible to feel a little “under the weather.” This can happen after any vaccine. It is the body’s immune response to getting vaccinated and a sign that the vaccine is starting to work.

After the COVID-19 vaccine, you may have:

• A sore arm where you got the shot

• A headache

• Chills

• Fever

• Tiredness

Over the counter pain relievers and fever reducers may help.

You should feel better in a day or two. If you still don’t feel well after two or three days, talk to your health care provider.

The State Department of Health’s Wadsworth Laboratory has confirmed cases of the United Kingdom (U.K.) coronavirus strain, also known as B.1.1.7, in New York State. While evidence indicates that the U.K. variant is more transmissible (contagious) than other variants, it is not believed to be more resistant to COVID-19 vaccines.

People can have allergic reactions to any medication or biological product such as a vaccine. Most allergic reactions occur shortly after a vaccine is administered, which is why the CDC recommends that persons with a history of anaphylaxis (due to any cause) are observed for 30 minutes after vaccination, while all other persons are observed for 15 minutes after vaccination. All vaccination sites must be equipped to ensure appropriate medical treatment is available in the event of an unlikely allergic reaction. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends anyone with an allergy to “any component” of the vaccine not get the vaccine.

Common side effects that have been observed in clinical studies include fatigue, muscle soreness at the injection site and fever.

No. While you may have some short-term antibody protection after recovering from COVID-19, we don’t know how long this protection lasts. Vaccination is the best protection, and it is safe. People who get COVID-19 can have serious illnesses, and some have debilitating symptoms that persist for months.

Researchers do not yet know how long immunity lasts after vaccination. That’s why continuing prevention practices like wearing a mask, washing your hands regularly and social distancing will still be important.

Yes. The CDC recommends that you get vaccinated even if you have already had COVID-19, because you can be infected more than once. While you may have some short-term antibody protection after recovering from COVID-19, we don’t know how long this protection will last. Vaccination is the best protection, and it is safe. People who get COVID-19 may have serious illnesses, and some have debilitating symptoms that persist for months.

Yes. You will need to continue to wear a mask, practice social distancing and good hand hygiene for the foreseeable future as the vaccine gets rolled out in phases.Experts need more time to understand the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide before deciding to change recommendations on mask use. Other factors, including how many people get vaccinated and how the virus is spreading in communities, will also affect this decision.

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